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to church could be making us overweight. zblifl and amazing grace. the unthinkable obstacles facing this bride to be. but she is determined to walk down that aisle. >>> and good evening. we begin tonight with startling n numbers about a super bug spreading. it's one of our biggest fears. the fear they'll catch one of those infections that antibiotics can't fight. tonight, it's all hands on deck at several hospitals to stop this from spreading. yunji de nies is in los angeles. good evening. >> reporter: good evening, david. health officials here in los angeles were stunned to find this brand new infection spreading. it is deadly and it is now surfacing across the country. and even our most powerful medicines, like this cipro, are unable to stop it. it may be the most dangerous super bug to date, spreading through hospitals, nursing homes and short-term care facilities. officials in southern california now identify more than 350 cases. people becoming gravely ill from this new infection known as crkp. steve winters knows just how powerful is super bugs can be. he took his 80-year-old
. but as president obama leads the u.s. into a third war in a muslim country, many wonder who exactly are we fighting for? we'll take you on a journey to a rebel stronghold for answers. >>> nuclear reality check. it's in the air, it's in the food, it's in the ocean. the fallout from japan's atomic catastrophe. do we know how far the radiation is spreading? what you need to know. >>> and the best kiss. this one was good. that one wasn't bad but no two hollywood smooches are alike. what was the greatest of all, the results next. >>> good evening, i'm bill weir. missiles and muzzle fire are lighting up the north african sky tonight as america and her allies continue to destroy the defenses of moammar gadhafi. the mission, according to president obama, was to stop the libyan dictate they are slaughtering more of his own people, but getting rid of gadhafi, not our job. for the moment, that task is still in the hands of a ragged group of rebels, and with more american blood and treasure on the line alexander markardt set out to find out. >> reporter: hundreds of cruise missile attacks against military post
perfume. but her humanitarian work may be her greatest legacy. using her fame, she raised millions for aids research, standing by rock hudson, one of its first victims, when others shunned him. to the public, she may have been the last great movie star. but for those who knew her, she was also a loving mother and loyal friend. >> there have been so many lessons, life and death lessons, emotional lessons. i don't believe in regrets. and i have no idea what's going to happen tomorrow, no one does. >> and barbara walters is here now. we were saying earlier, we don't think of her as a pioneer, but her sheer fearlessness about her own choices in life changed things in this country. >> reporter: absolutely. by the way, she never wrote her all biography. this, all the different clips that people will see, that's her all biography. she was gutsy and salty and funny. look at what we talked about. married eight times, she wanted to get married, she married them. she wanted to divorce them, she divorced them. she jumped into aids when nobody did. she stood by people who were rejected. michael
for 500 years, this man told us -- he's worried. yes, he told us, we are very much concerned about it. and we hope things will settle down as soon as possible. the government wants more and better information from the power company. in fact, a special adviser to the prime minister of japan was appointed today to try to make that happen. it seems even the government here is having a hard time getting to the truth of exactly what's going on with those reactors. dan? >> incredible amount of confusion, still this morning. neal karlinsky reporting from japan. we appreciate it. >>> for more on what this means and how serious it is for people in japan, let's bring in physicist michio kaku in berkeley this morning. thanks for joining us. we appreciate it. >> no problem. >> when we hear about the apology, the rather extraordinary apology from power officials, what is your take on that? >> i think that, if i had the ear of the prime minister, instead of accepting the apology, i would simply remove the utility entirely from leadership of this crisis. and instead, bring in a top team of the world
of the skies. so what's next for u.s. forces and what will gadhafi do now? >>> radiation in food from japan. >> fukushima fresh vegetables. >> we do our own tests. >>> and an american family after ten days of hope learns their daughter was lost trying to save others. >>> men, women and jobs. which sex is getting 90% of the new jobs and why? >>> and sibling secrets. are you an older or younger sibling? news by which order gives you an edge in health and happiness. >>> good evening, as we come on the air tonight beginning this week together the united states is still in the middle of an international assault on moammar gadhafi's libya. but the battle is moving at breakneck speed. it is called "operation odyssey dawn" and as of tonight the skies are clear. gadhafi's forces have come to a halt though there are still big questions. how soon can the u.s. hand over the lead to other countries? who are these libyan rebels and are we even on the same side? and what is next? will gadhafi fold or could this go on for years? we have team coverage from washington to libya beginning with martha raddatz o
for the u.s. to hand over a huge part of that bold operation over libya. and tonight, an abc news exclusive. martha raddatz with extraordinary access. behind me, you're looking at the "usskearsarge." martha spending hours on board with the american commander. tonight, the latest on these new u.s. plans to hand over partial control and she has ne details about the rescue of those u.s. pilots ejecting from 22,000 feet and tough questions for the commander. will this operation be a success in the end? martha landed back at a u.s. base in italy just a short time ago and has the latest. >> reporter: good evening, david. there are a lot of details to be worked out about that nato plan, but we did spend a remarkable day jumping from warship to warship with the man currently in charge. general carter ham took charge of africa command on march 9th. ten days later, he was at war. and now, he is here, in the middle of the fight, touring the u.s. warships off the coast in libya. he brought the sailors and marines some encouragement from their commander in chief -- >> he said, how are the attacks going?
it. >> yeah, we do. >>> first, the fierce winter weather back hitting us hard in spring. sam is out in a wintry mix. even though it's spring. >> yeah, it is a mix. we're getting a bounce off the jacket in the ice in the rain. mostly in times square, this is what we're dealing with. a little water to kick around. look at butler, new jersey, just 30 miles northwest. and a little elevation. you get snow out of the situation. and that's what the northeast is worried about. colder temperatures and some snow, even through tonight. there's plenty of places. we had 12 states with winter weather watches and advisories. 80 reports of severe weather. and damage from that weather. our barbara pinto is in winterset, iowa. and some twisters touched down. >> reporter: look at this. 1 of 16 tornadoes here in winterset, blowing this barn to bits. the tornado siren sounded around the dinner hour, sending people here and across the state, running for safety. this storm was powerful. it dumped golf ball-sized hail. tore roofs and siding from homes. toppled power lines. thankfully, no one was hurt. but
as a subject and friend. barbara walters is here with us. you interviewed elizabeth five times. reaction to her death is really breathtaking out there. on tv news, all the way out to twitter. really touched something deep in the country, across the generations, too. why? what was it about her that captured or imagination and held it for so long? >> reporter: well, i did interview her five times, but i also considered elizabeth taylor a friend and many people don't realize this, she had four children, ten grandchildren and four great-grandchildren and she loved them dearly, so, i would like to say that my heart and sympathies go out to her family tonight. but to your question. everything she did was larger than life. she was the most beautiful child star. she was the most exquisite adult leading lady. she had 50 movies, two oscars, eight marriages, two to the same man. scandalous headlines and courageous activism. she lived her life her way and, terry, she didn't give a damn what anybody else thought about it. there are some people for whom even the words superstar seems too small. elizabeth tay
, everyone. thanks for being with us today. it's the recent surge in gas price. this morning, the president is considering drastic measures to turn it around. >> here's why. according to one survey, the average price for a gallon of gas is $3.47. 7 cents higher than last year this time. >> emily schmidt has details. >> reporter: good morning to you. the calendar says march, but it might as well be memorial day when it comes to gas prices. they are going up higher and faster than anytime in history. and now, some are asking the president, what are you going to do about it. with gas prices skyrocketing, americans are reaching their limits earlier. >> i cannot afford to fill up the tank. >> reporter: the nationwide average is $3.38 a gallon. a new lundberg survey says that's up 33 cents in two week. the second biggest price increase on record means spending more. >> up until this point, $50 about every two weeks. and now, it's gone up to $60 every two weeks, now, we're up to almost $75. >> reporter: the prices go with the middle east uprising. so far there are no shortages, just worry. the whi
will the u.s. lead the quest to crush gadhafi's forces? >>> severe spring weather. one of california's biggest rainmaker ever. spawning blizzards and tornadoes across the country. >>> and dancing debut. kirstie alley, even the karate kid, make their quest for the mirrorball trophy. >>> good morning. the no-fly zone in libya appears easier to enforce this morning after another round of military might. >> here, now, are the latest developments from libya. u.s.-led air strikes lit up the skies over tripoli for a third night. >> but the american military commanders are looking to hand over control of this operation as soon as possible. >> president obama says, while moammar gadhafi needs to go, the libyan leader is not the target of the air strikes. emily schmidt begins our coverage this morning in washington. good morning, emily. >> reporter: rob and peggy, good morning to you. moammar gadhafi has kept an uncharacteristically low profile the last couple of days. no signs of him amidst all the signs of an expanding no-fly zone. for yet another day, coalition forces are targeting libya. a
>>> making news in america this morning -- >> the u.s. is transferring command of the operation against moammar gadhafi's force in libya, just as the mission gains more arab support. >>> safety concerns about the nation's air traffic control system after one controller missed sleeping on the job. >>> and the champion dethroned. duke is dominated by arizona, as the march madness sweet 16 gets into high gear. >>> and good morning, everyone. thanks for being with us today. there is a major change in command in enforcing that no-fly zone over libya. libya -- nato has agreed to take charge of those operations. >> and the changeover from u.s. hands could take place as early as tomorrow. emily schmidt is joining us now from washington with the latest details. >> reporter: the u.s. has been cutting back on its role in this no-fly zone enforcement. in fact, just yesterday, the pentagon said 75% of the combat missions are now flown by the coalition partners. soon, this transition is going to be official. the no-fly zone over libya that has international support is now getting internationa
? >> at least she's coming out of the penalty to be with us. good morning, america. we have david muir with us, as george continues to take time off. you know what we're going to do this morning? we're going to celebrate elizabeth taylor's life. and our colleague, barbara walters, shares her memories of the icon. and we'll have a look at her jaw-dropping jewels. and the men in her life that lavished her with those jewels. >>> also coming up in this first half hour, what critics are calling a political stunt. this is out of japan this morning. tokyo's governor downing a glass of tap water, just 24 hours after that water was called radioactive. can it really shift this quickly? >>> we're going to start with the wild weather overnight all across the country. sam will have the forecast in a moment. but first, matt gutman joins us from westmoreland county, pennsylvania. >> reporter: good morning. this is a roof tile. that's the only part of this roof that's left. in 15 seconds of terror, residents here tell me that the entire neighborhood was shaking. porches up off the street. houses like this, ma
for the morning commute as the white house weighs use emergency reserves for the first time in almost 40 years. >>> wild weather. twisters tearing up part of the south. heavy rain washes out the east. a 3-month-old baby rescued from rising waters. >>> lindsay lohan in that jewelry store where she's accused of taking a necklace. >>> and you're angry but what if you heard this over the p.a. system? ♪ oh girls they want to have fun ♪ >>> and good morning, america. hopefully, everybody had a great weekend. i know there was some bad weather, maybe you got stuck at the airport. but did you have cyndi lauper at your airport serenading you? >> i think that would put me in a good mood, only if it was followed by ♪ and your plane is leaving right now ♪ >> exactly. >> we have a lot to get to this morning. big day for the president. first cattle call in iowa. five going to take the stage tonight. the first caucus is less than a yearway. who is not jumping in? sarah palin actually weighing in on an interview as she's on her way to india. all of that ahead. >>> also, george, more controversy brewing
's the order for millions as radiation levels spike. >>> mission accomplished? u.s. strikes on libya would soon be over. but overnight, gadhafi says he will win. >>> and powerful, spring storms spawn tornados in the heartland, as a system now targets the northeast. >>> good morning. we begin this morning with some breaking news out of tokyo, japan. that city of about 7 million people has a new concern about radiation right now. >> and it's flowing out of every tap. new tests on tokyo's water have found it to be two times above the limit for radioactive iodine considered safe for infants. parents are now being told to keep it away from youngsters. but the level of iodine is said to pose no immediate health risk to adults. >> and broccoli was added to the list of vegetables taken from around the nuclear plant. the fda has halted all imports from that region. we'll have more coming up. >>> meanwhile, there is word of evacuation of the workers from the fukushima nuclear plant. that evacuation came amid come black smoke from the reactor. it could still be weeks or months before power lines could pow
a little time off. good to have david muir back with us this morning. >> great to be here, robin. breaking news on the f-15, coming in this morning. >> in libya, on the third day of air strikes this morning. we're not sure where the pilot is this morning. but the other pilot is safe. this is coming in right now. developments are coming in. we'll keep you up-to-date. and more on one of gadhafi's sons died after a libyan pilot made a suicide attack. >>> and brian ross is here with an eye-opening look at where gadhafi might be. we'll show you the deep, underground tunnels, the elaborate hideaway where's the libyan leader might be hiding. >>> we want to get to martha raddatz in washington this morning, that's covering the f-15, that's gone down. we have the pictures coming in. what do we know this morning about the two pilots? >> reporter: well, we believe that both the members of the air crew are safe. the pilot and the weapons system officer. that's the officer who sits in the back. one of them has been recovered with minor injuries. the other, is recovery is in process right now. this went
. for the latest on the closest of calls in this young war, we turn to the only reporter ever to fly a u.s. combat mission. martha raddatz has tonight's "target libya" report. >> reporter: late last night, the two-man crew of the f-15 strike eagle took off from aviano air base. their mission? take out deadly air defenses in libya. this is what flying in one of those 40-ton, $60 million fighter jets is like, as i learned when i flew a combat mission in an identical plan in afghanistan last year. the takeoff in an f-15 is exhilarating. the power, indescribable. we rocket up to 20,000 feet in just over a minute. our aircraft, like all in war zones, laden with thousands of pounds of bombs. >> confirm the hos times are still in that tree line. >> reporter: our mission, a deadly serious one. provide air support for troops on the ground. >> you are clear hot. clear hot. >> reporter: suspected enemy combat dances with 20 millimeter cannon rounds to protect friendly forces. back to the f-15 in libya, the moment of crisis came at 11:30 p.m. local time. there is an urgent mechanical malfunction. >> there's a
and sleep. i'll stay in the back of this car until gadhafi leaves, he told us. we all will. we edge closer to the key oil city of ras lanuf, now the tip of the spear in the fight to bring down gadhafi. the battle is close. the charred evidence of fresh fighting is everywhere as is the thud of artillery fire. this is where all the fighters are gathering right now. this is the furthest west that we're able to go. just 30 miles west from where we are standing right here, there's a big battle in a place called bin jawad. that is just up ahead where gadhafi's forces attacked using their advantage, fighter jets to pound the rebels, stopping their march toward gadhafi's stronghold in tripoli. for now. and for now it is as far as we can go too. lama hasan, abc news, ras lanuf, libya. >> unbelievable. >>> political uncertainty in libya and other oil-producing countries has sent fuel prices skyrocketing. a record for this time of year, $3.52. over the past four weeks, prices have jumped 39 cents per gallon and analysts say no immediate relief in sight. >>> even though gas prices are the highest they
of the key points of advice she used to give. tonight, she tells vicki mabrey why. >> look how tall you're are. you're a real man. >> reporter: deonte murphy and his mom wanted to thank suze orman for making their american dream come true. last time they met was seven years ago. >> do you get an allowance? >> yes. >> how much do you get? >> $10. >> reporter: a chance encounter on his 10th birthday, where suze taught them both about saving. >> what if i told you, if you put it in the bank, the bank will pay you to put it there. >> reporter: his mother cut back on hair and beauty treatments and had money deticketed to start a 529 college fund for her son. >> it's my only child and i wanted him to actually attend college. because you need a degree. >> reporter: deonte is now 17, a senior in high school where he plays basketball. but they didn't want to depend on athletics to get him into college. following suze's advice, she saved money from her paralegal salary. now, she's put more than $30,000 away to send her son to college. >> i didn't think at the time that i could even save any money
. >> i think the problem is the rain, the snow melt, the dam up river. it never used to get this bad. >> reporter: northern new jersey rivers are overflowing their banks. a potent combination of three inches of rain and massive snow melt. all the rainfall in little falls is proving too much. >> really nothing i can do, but i'm stressed. i'm stressed. >> reporter: melting snow brought mud slides to massachusetts and in connecticut, the majority of state's rivers have surpassed flood stage. >> we have about a foot and a half of water inside the house. the entire living space is completely trashed. we can't -- we have nowhere to live right now. >> reporter: this man traversed the icy waters with a canoe. with cars underwater, firefighters had to use boats to rescue residents. >> it was pretty bad. my electrical wire underneath was in water, so i shut down my power and i left and went to my mom's. >> reporter: the worst may be still to come. another storm is brewing in the south. it's expected to dump another one to two inches starting tomorrow. paul wayne has work to to do. not a river,
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19